Easy To Build Tractor Bucket Hitch Plans
(New improved heavier duty design)
"Hitch worked great. Boy does it make it easier to move the trailer around. No side play on the hitch.
Thanks so much."
-J. Dorcak
MODERN AVIATION ENGINES

VOLUME ONE


NOTE

Volume One contains Chapters One to Twenty - seven inclusive - Pages 1 to 976.

Volume Two contains Chapters Twenty -  eight to Forty -
six inclusive - Pages 977 to1908.

Have you ever tried to park a trailer in a tight spot that you can just barely get your truck and trailer into? Like between a carelessly placed oak tree, and a big drainage ditch? I have. And when you do, you know there's no way to get a trailer to go to the right location because you have no room to turn your truck or pull forward without making your truck become part of a tree trunk. Also, if you ever have to pull a trailer into a dead end driveway because it is impossible to back into, this device will save you a lot of headaches. Pull in forward, and disconnect your trailer from your truck. Throw this hitch on your tractor bucket, and put the trailer just about anywhere you want it. A hitch on the steering end of a tow vehicle allows much more effective maneuvering in smaller spaces, with almost a zero turn radius possible.

I have never seen a hitch like this sold anywhere, and that's why I came up with this design.
You can build one of these yourself with common and easy to find materials. I make every attempt to make plans that can be built with common tools, so you don't have to own a fabrication or machine shop to build it. This hitch is not beyond the skill set of the average DIY craftsman using common tools in his shed or garage. These plans will show you everything you need to know along with 3D illustrations for a very reasonable cost.

Even if you aren't planning to build one of these right away, get a set of these plans for your reference library, because you never know, I might decide to retire someday and take my plans with me.

The plans are available for $9.95. Get the plans while they're still available.



  • Easy to Build
  • Easy to Install And Remove
  • Easy to Download PDF File
  • 20 Page Booklet with Large Format Prints
  • Simple to Follow 2D Drawings
  • 3D Model Views Eliminate Guess Work
  • Can Be Built with Common Tools
  • Only Requires a Few Beads of Weld
  • No Expensive Exotic Materials Required
  • Can Be Built in a Weekend in Your Shed or Garage
Hon. ]ohn H. Trumbull, Governor of the State of Connecticut Who is an Expert Airplane Pilot, is Shown in Flying Costume at the Right With His Teacher, Lieut. Harry D. ("Safety First") Copland,A.C. C.N.G., Who Has an Enviable Record as a Flight Instructor.
You are free to build and sell these hitches. I don't know how much you could make doing this, but it might be a good side income for an ambitious person. I would think you could ask at least a hundred dollars for them. Build these along with the bucket forks that I also sell plans for, and start a product line. All I ask in return is that you mention that you used an Arnold's Design plan on your ads, website, videos, or other promotions to help me promote my site. By buying these plans, you agree not to copy, transfer, or sell my plans to a third party. (I respect others intellectual property and I expect the same from you). All testing and liability insurance is the responsibility of the builder/seller.
MODERN AVIATION ENGINES

DESIGN-CONSTRUCTION-OPERATION AND REPAIR

A COMPLETE, PRACTICAL TREATISE OUTLINING CLEARLYTHE ELEMENTS OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINEERINGWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND REPAIR OF AIRPLANE POWER
PLANTS; ALSO THE AUXILIARY ENGINE SYSTEMS, SUCH AS LUBRICATION, CARBURETION, IGNITION AND COOLING

It Includes Complete Instructions for Engine Repairing and SystematicLocation of Troubles, Tool Equipment and Use of Tools, also Outlinesthe Latest Mechanical Processes

IN TWO VOLUMES

BY

MAJOR VICTOR W. PAGE', U. S. AIR CORPS RESERVE
Member of the society of Automobile Engineers, Inc.Late Chief Engineering Officer, signal Corps Aviation school, Mine-013., L. I. Late Chief Aeronautical Engineer, 3rd Aviation InstructionCenter, A. E. Forces, Issoudon, Indre. France.Author 0f Modern Aircraft, Everybody's Aviation Guide, Etc.

Describes Many Typical American and European Engines and Their Installation. Contains Valuable Instructions for all Aviation Students, Pilots,Mechanicians, Flying Field Engineering Officers and All Interested inthe Design, Construction and Upkeep of Airplane Powerplants.

VOLUME ONE

NEW YORK
THE NORMAN W. HENLEY PUBLISHING COMPANY2 WEST 45th STREET
1929

Order the plans below
for the low price of $9.95.

A Preview of The Plans
COPYRIGHT, 1929

BY
THE NORMAN W. HENLEY PUBLISHING C0.


REFORMATTED, AND REPRINTED
BY

ARNOLD PUBLICATIONS
RIDGWAY PA 15853



MOST OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS IN THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN
SPECIALLY MADE BY THE PUBLISHERS, AND THEIR USE, WITHOUT PERMISSION, IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED













PRINTED IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
THIS TREATISE IS RESPECTFULLY

DEDICATED TO


HON. JOHN H. TRUMBULL

GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT


WHO PREACHES AVIATION AND PRACTICES WHAT HE PREACHES


IN APPRECIATION OF THE EXAMPLE SET BY HIM
FOR THE COMING GENERATION TO EMULATE AND FOR
HIS WORK IN PROMOTING COMMERCIAL AVIATION
PREFACE

In presenting this treatise on "Modern Aviation Engines," the writer realizes that the rapidly developing art makes it difficult to outline all latest forms or describe all current engineering practice. This exposition has been prepared primarily for instruction purposes and is adapted for students who wish to become aviators or aviation mechanicians, and for mechanics in other lines who wish to enter the aviation industry as experienced aviation engine maintenance and repair men. Every effort has been made to have the engineering information accurate, but owing to the diversity of authorities consulted and use of data translated from foreign language periodicals, it is expected that some errors will be present. The writer wishes to acknowledge his indebtedness to many firms for photographs and helpful descriptive matter and endeavor has been made inevery ease to give credit to the firm furnishing such data, also to experts in various lines that have been quoted in this treatise. Special attention has been paid to instructions on tool equipment, use of tools, trouble "shooting" and engine repairs, as it is on these points that the average aviation student is weakest. Only such theoretical consideration of thermodynamics as was deemed absolutely necessary to secure a proper understanding of engine action (after consulting several experienced instructors) is included, the writer's efforts having been confined to the preparation of a practical series of instructions that would be of the greatest value to those who need a diversified knowledge of internal-combustion engine construction, operation and repair, and who must acquire it quickly. The engines described and illustrated are all practical forms that have been fitted to airplanes capable of making extended flights and may be considered fairly representative of the present state of the art.
Considerable space is devoted to the leading war-time engines in both the water- and air-cooled forms because some of these are still in use and also because these are the types from which our present day perfected engines have been developed and a review of their characteristics should be of value in showing the reader what has been done in the past, so he can better understand the possibilities of the future. As aviation and the increasing use of aircraft has practically eliminated national boundaries, this book has been made international in scope and many practical and successful European engines have been illustrated and described along with our own American product.

VICTOR W, PAGE.
March, 1929






vii
ACKNOWLEDGMENT

One of the most important branches of aeronautical engineering is that dealing with powerplant design, construction, installation and repair and aeronautical engineers may be divided into two main groups, "plane" men and "engine" men. The division of the engine men is in three main classes; designers, builders or production men and field men who are concerned with installation, maintenance and repair. Specialists in any of the subdivisions find that it takes all their time to become familiar with the many phases of the subject they are interested in. While the author has had a broader experience than many of the specialists, it is only because he has been identified with aviation since its inception and because of particularly fortunate circumstances while serving on the Staff of the Chief of the Air Corps during the World War, which offered unexcelled opportunities to obtain experience on a larger scale than normal peace time activities permitted.
        Regardless of this experience, the author has found it desirable and even necessary to consult other authorities and specialists in order to check up on his own opinions and experience and every effort has been made in this treatise to present both sides of every controversial subject. The reader may select the line of reasoning that best applies to the case under consideration and no matter what he finally accepts, he will find ample authority as a basis for his line of thought. In preparing this work the author has made references to the authority responsible for the opinions or information presented and in every case due acknowledgment is made in the text to the expert quoted, when the opinions are not those of the author.
        There are many sources of aeronautical data at the present time besides the manufacturers of airplanes, engines and auxiliary apparatus. Government documents and publications of the Engineering Division, U. S. Army Air Corps, with laboratory facilities at Wilbur Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio; and also those of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Washington, D. C.; have been consulted freely and brief excerpts and abstracts from these public documents have been used to bring out points in the text that were considered in greater detail in reports of experts and specialists. The United States Bureau of Standards, and the United States Department of Commerce, Washington, D. C., have also published much valuable data in the form of reports issued in co-operation with the Government agencies previously mentioned.
        The membership of the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc., includes many aeronautical experts and specialists and much valuable data has been published in the S.A.E. Journal on aviation and kindred subjects. The publications Aviation and Aero Digest of New York City were also of great value and references to editorial opinions and descriptions of aircraft engines, have also been included to justify and support some of the opinions of the author. Such leaders in the industry as the Goodyear-Zeppelin Co.,

ix
ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Akron, Ohio; the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, Inc, of Garden City, New York; Packard Motor Car Co., Detroit, Mich.; the Wright Aeronautical Corporation, Paterson, New jersey; Pratt & Whitney Aeronautical Corporation, Hartford, Conn.; as well as numerous other firms whose products are described in the text, furnished valuable illustrative and descriptive data. The Bureau of Aeronautics, U. S. Navy and the Information Section, U. S. Army Air Corps, also furnished material pertinent to service planes, airships, and engines. A number of early engines were described in Angle's Airplane Engine Encyclopedia which was also referred to in preparing this volume.
        The writer desires to acknowledge the valuable assistance obtained from the sources mentioned as they have greatly supplemented the material in the original aviation engine instruction papers prepared for students and Army mechanics during the late War and the author's experience in aviation since its inception over two decades ago that forms the ground work for this treatise. The character of co-operation obtained cannot fail to promote knowledge of aviation and proper public appreciation of its great possibilities.
        The public spirit and enthusiastic co-operation of the publisher of this treatise in going to an unusual expense in financing extended research work of the author and for the numerous excellent special illustrations that accompany the text, in order to help the cause of aviation and also in giving the writer carte blanche in the preparation of an unusually complete work without allowing purely business reasons to limit the size and scope, is also worthy of comment and appreciative acknowledgment.

Victor W. Page'.
March, 1929




















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